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Wednesday, 10 July 2013 09:36

App store row settled

Written by Nick Farrell

 Amazon Logo

Amazon and Apple bury one hatchet


Apple and Amazon have ended their lawsuit over who has the right to use the "app store" name. The move prevents an embarrassing kicking for Apple which started the whole thing by claiming it owned the word “app store.”

US District Judge Phyllis Hamilton in Oakland, California, on Tuesday ordered that the case be dismissed at the companies' request, averting a trial that had been scheduled for August 19. Apple began selling applications for mobile devices via its App Store service in July 2008. Amazon launched Amazon Appstore for Android in March 2011. Apple began the lawsuit that month.

Apple has issued to Amazon a covenant not to sue over the online retailer's use of the term and removed the need for Amazon to pursue a counterclaim. Jobs’ Mob accused Amazon of misusing the "app store" name in connection with the sales of apps for Android devices and the Kindle Fire, a tablet that competes with Apple's iPad. Amazon pointed out that the term "app store" had become so generic that using it would not mislead customers.

Apple’s case was largely stuffed up by the fact that even its Chief Executive Tim Cook had used the term generically when discussing "the number of app stores out there." Apple messiah Steve Jobs had talked about the "four app stores on Android."


Nick Farrell

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