Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 02 July 2013 10:49

Microsoft pulls the plug on Technet

Written by Nick Farrell

15 years of a fairly generous system scrapped

Microsoft is to retire one of its more generous subscription systems after 15 years of service. Technet not be available after August and the subscription service will shut down as current subscribers' contracts end.

Microsoft has offered TechNet subscriptions since 1998 as a massive packet of CDs, and evolving into a download option as broadband connections became common. For an annual subscription fee of a few hundred dollars, subscribers get the right to download nearly every desktop and server software Microsoft sold with multiple product keys.

While the software was licensed for evaluation purposes only, but that restriction is part of the license agreement and not enforced in the software itself. It was a way to get cut-rate Windows client and server upgrades and licenses with product keys would up activating Windows on PCs deployed.

What appears to have killed the programme off was that the deal was great for software pirates, who figured out long ago that they could subscribe to TechNet and sell the keys. Microsoft cut the number of product keys available to TechNet subscribers in 2010 and again a year ago, in 2012. It also changed the terms so that usage rights expired when the subscription did.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments