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Wednesday, 26 June 2013 17:30

Mobile employees hate their tech

Written by Nick Farrell



Talking about the revolution

A survey has revealed that the mobile revolution might not be all that it is cracked up to be. Researched commissioned by AppSense in the UK shows that employees are dissatisfied with their corporate mobile IT experience.

More than 72 per cent of 1,000 surveyed end-users were limited to only being able to access corporate email on their mobile device and had no access to corporate applications or data while out of the office. Another 63 per cent of respondents also felt that when accessing work email on a personal device the experience was of a lower standard than personal email or they found it difficult to switch between the two.

Two fifths of end-users believed that they would be more productive if they were allowed to use their own mobile devices for work purposes. This highlights a significant share of the workforce willing to meet their own IT needs and a desire to participate in a bring Your Own Device (BYOD) scheme. This is in stark contrast to the fact that only 19 per cent of IT managers who believe employees want to see BYOD implemented for reasons of productivity.

Despite this dissatisfaction amongst end-users, only 43 per cent of IT managers see meeting employee expectations as a benefit and driver for adopting a BYOD policy. Nick Lowe, VP of Sales, EMEA, AppSense said that the figures highlight that there is a disconnect between the IT department and the employee over mobile.

“Users are becoming frustrated with the experience offered to them and see it as restrictive, while this research would suggest that IT decision makers are oblivious as to what is happening all around them in their own organisations,” he said.

Nick Farrell

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