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Wednesday, 26 June 2013 13:42

Samsung close to resolving EU anti-trust case

Written by Nick Farrell

Deal on the table

Samsung is in talks with the EU regulator to settle charges that its use of injunctions against arch rival Apple breached antitrust rules.

The European Commission, which acts as EU competition regulator, told Samsung in December that it was acting unfairly by seeking court injunctions against Apple over the use of its patents. Word on the Street is that Samsung has been involved in settlement discussions for several months now and wants to settle.

It was still too early to say if the discussions would result in a settlement with no finding of wrongdoing for Samsung and no fine. If it fights the EU it could reach a fine of $17.3 billion if the South Korean firm is found to be in breach of EU laws. What appears to have happened was that the Commission constructed a theory of harm based on the concept of a willing licensee, in which Apple was willing to pay but Samsung didn't negotiate.

Nick Farrell

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