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Thursday, 12 June 2008 07:28

University of Utah loses 2.2 million patient records

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Data tapes left in car overnight

The University of Utah has acknowledged that a box of backup tapes containing the billing records of at least 2.2 million patients was stolen last week from an employee’s car who was employed by third party courier service, Perpetual Storage.

The courier apparently left the tapes in his car overnight outside his home. The tapes were headed to Perpetual Storage’s facility for archival. The tapes contained the confidential information of patients seen at the University of Utah’s hospitals and clinics, including names and addresses, Social Security Numbers and demographical information.

A University spokeswoman indicated that the employee had been fired by Perpetual Storage and that further services between Perpetual and the University were on hold. It was not known if the data on the tapes was encrypted.

The University has announced a $1,000 cash reward for the return of the stolen tapes with "no questions asked."

Last modified on Thursday, 12 June 2008 07:56

David Stellmack

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