Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 10 June 2008 07:28

More data theft compromises private information

Written by David Stellmack


Image

This time, at Stanford University


Yet another theft has occurred which has made the private information of up to 72,000 Stanford University faculty members, staff and students subject to potential identity theft.  A community laptop containing the names, addresses, Social Security numbers, birth dates, University ID and employee staff numbers, as well as their salary history, was stolen recently.

While the theft may have been random, Stanford has issued an alert, warning that the data on the laptop was not encrypted. Given the recent history of technology equipment thefts and the huge database of information on this laptop, it is difficult to comprehend why Stanford did not take a simple and routine security measure by encrypting the data on this laptop.

As usual, the University attempted to discourage and downplay concerns that whoever has the laptop does not know that the data is there or even what to do with the information. While we keep hearing this excuse from the institutions that have lost users’ data, we have to wonder just how dumb they think all criminals are.  It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to recognize names, addresses, Social Security Numbers and birth dates as being valuable information that somebody might pay a lot of money for.

Unfortunately, the list of recent data compromises keeps growing, with two additional incidents confirmed last week.  A laptop containing salary data on management staffers at AT&T Inc. was stolen, while a laptop belonging to the New Mexico Department of Workplace Solutions was also stolen.  Neither laptop had encrypted the data on it.

Last modified on Tuesday, 10 June 2008 15:26

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments