Featured Articles

IDC says PC market is rebounding

IDC says PC market is rebounding

Research firm IDC has published its latest report into the state of the PC market and while there are some signs…

More...
TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC, the world’s biggest chip foundry for hire, has reportedly stepped up development of its 10nm manufacturing process.

More...
Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

A while ago we mentioned that Broadwell won’t show up in the desktop space this year and we got it right.…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

The EVGA GTX 780 Classified has been dethroned as the company’s fastest non-Titan card following the introduction of the GTX 780…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 17 April 2013 10:48

Haswell tablets to offer 8 to 10 hour battery life

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Y processor 1-chip SoC line

We have already mentioned Intel’s one-chip Haswell platform on several occasions, but we have managed to get a few extra details about this chip. As we have stated many times before 1 chip Haswell has BGA packaging packed with SoC that integrates a Haswell CPU as well as Lynx Point LP PCH chipset inside.

The SoC packaging leads to lower production costs, power footprint and lower TDP, everything that you need in order to drive the SoC price down. We remembered Dave Orton, the former CEO of a company acquired by AMD that went by the name of ATI, explaining the importance of APUs and SoCs. The explanation is rather simple, the more you integrate the cheaper the chip ends up, the fewer pins you have and theoretically you can make more money. This conversation happened in the summer of 2007, roughly a year after AMD acquired ATI and announced its plans to produce Fusion APUs.

Since the top ARM chips such as Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 / 600 and Tegra 4 have multiple cores, chipset elements and graphics all on the same package, it was only natural for Intel to take the same approach with Haswell. Qualcomm, Nvidia and Intel are after the same market, tablets, notebooks, convertibles with a slight advantage that Intel has X86 and the other two don’t.

Let's not forget that Haswell 1- chip is much bigger than any ARM based top performers, but at the same time Haswell brings a lot more performance. Despite billions of transistors and 22nm SoC design tablets and Ultrabooks based on 1-chip Haswell or Haswell-ULT how some call it, you can expect 8- to 10-hour battery from products based on this Y processor line chips. This is a respectable score for PC like performance and having a scenario design power (SDP) typical expected TDP at 7.5W these products come close to the top ARM performers that have 5+W TDP.

Intel stresses that these chips won't simply land in tablets and Ultrabooks. It plans to use them in detachable, foldable and similar designs usually represented as the result of an unholy coupling between a notebook and a tablet.

The bad thing is that Y line of tablet, Ultrabook, de-attachable, switchable SoC Haswell chips only comes in Q4 2013 so we are in for a pretty long wait.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments