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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 28 March 2013 16:57

EVGA GTX 650 Ti BOOST Superclocked reviewed - Thermals, Noise and Consumption

Written by Sanjin Rados

650 ti boost sc thumb recommended08 75

Review: Good performance at a tempting price

 
EVGA GTX 650 Ti Boost Superclocked is completely silent while idling. While gaming, the fan can be audible, but it is quiet enough not to be considered a distraction. On the whole we were pleased, and the good temperature/noise ratio was attained thanks to EVGA’s custom cooler. As we can see from the screenshots, the temperatures were kept at bay, even with an overclocked GPU.

650 ti boost superclocked load crysis 2


650 ti boost superclocked idle

 

In terms of power consumption, the GTX 650 Ti Boost does rather well. The XFX Radeon HD 7850, which offers similar performance, consumes a bit less power than EVGA’s factory overlocked card.

The typical power draw for the reference card in so-called non-TDP apps is 115W. Nvidia claims the TDP is 140W. If we take the power slider to 110 percent, as is recommended for overclocking, we hit 127W in non-TDP apps. EVGA’s GTX 650 Ti Boost Superclocked uses slightly, more power than the reference card. Since it is powered through the PCIe slot and 6-pin power connector, it could theoretically draw up to 150W, so there is more than enough headroom. In any case GPU Boost should keep power consumption in check and throttle the clocks accordingly. We measured system consumption, without the monitor, of course.


power

(Page 19 of 20)
Last modified on Wednesday, 03 April 2013 07:09
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