Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 22 March 2013 10:41

US government plans to scan private companies

Written by Nick Farrell



Defence in the land of the free

As part of its defence plans the US government is planning to he US government is expanding a cybersecurity program that scans Internet traffic headed into and out of contractors.

The move will include more of the country's private, civilian-run infrastructure than ever before. Private sector employees, including those at big banks, utilities and key transportation companies, will have their emails and Web surfing scanned as a precaution against cyber-attacks.

As you might expect this is not going down with big business. After all they might be a little worried that some of their illegal activity might get revealed to the government. The move comes as part of last month's White House executive order on cybersecurity.

The scans will use classified information provided by US spooks on new or especially serious espionage threats and other hacking attempts. Homeland Security will gather the secret data and pass it to a small group of telecommunication companies and cybersecurity providers that have employees holding security clearances, government and industry officials said.

Telecom companies will not report back to the government on what they see, except in aggregate statistics, a senior DHS official claimed. The question is, whether the US people and big business trust their government.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments