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Wednesday, 28 May 2008 07:15

Google details its App Engine

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Unveils pricing

Google Inc. is holding its first Developer Conference in San Francisco, California, and has opened the doors for its Google App Engine for all, as well as revealed the pricing for its cloud-based development environment.

Google indicated it expects about 3,000 developers to attend the Conference. The Google App Engine provides hosted dynamic Web serving, persistent storage, automatic scaling, a local development environment, and authentication and load balancing, aimed at developers and making it easier for them to build Web applications. Google is hyping the App Engine as a means for developers to take advantage of its huge infrastructure to build, test and run their own applications.

The Google App Engine is aimed at providing access for developers to the same building blocks that Google uses for its own applications, making it easier for developers to build an application that runs reliably, even under heavy loads and large amounts of data. According to Google every Google App Engine application will have up to 500MB of persistent storage and enough CPU bandwidth for about 5 million page views per month.

Its preview version was made available for free to the first 10,000 developers who signed up. It was released in April and since then more than 150,000 developers have joined the waiting list for the Google App Engine. Starting on May 28th it will be available to any developer without waiting, according to Google.

The pricing of the Google App Engine has been a highly sought-after answer, and Google has finally released that information. According to the information we’ve received, there is no charge to get started using the Google App Engine. The current preview release applications will continue to be restricted to the “free quota" of up to 500MB storage and sufficient CPU and bandwidth for approximately 5 million page views per month. Once the preview period has ended, developers will be charged the following amounts:

- $0.10 - $0.12 per CPU core-hour
- $0.15 - $0.18 per GB-month of storage
- $0.11 - $0.13 per GB outgoing bandwidth
- $0.09 - $0.11 per GB incoming bandwidth

Google also announced the addition of new developer APIs for the Google App Engine in the near future, which will allow developers to scale, rotate and crop images on the server. Also included in the API is a new memcache API that should make page rendering faster for developers through a high-performance caching layer.

Last modified on Wednesday, 28 May 2008 07:39

David Stellmack

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