Featured Articles

Android Wear installed on 50-100k phones

Android Wear installed on 50-100k phones

Android Wear is a companion app that you need in order to run your new Android Wear watch.

More...
AMD launches 45W desktop Kaveri parts, finally

AMD launches 45W desktop Kaveri parts, finally

AMD has finally launched three 45W Kaveri SKUs, which were in the works for months. The three chips feature configurable TDP,…

More...
Desktop Broadwell LGA is Socket 1150

Desktop Broadwell LGA is Socket 1150

Broadwell was supposed to come in 2014 and it will ship in the last quarter of this year for detachable thin…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 21 February 2013 11:53

MIT researchers develop new image processing chip

Written by Peter Scott

farnsworth

HDR for the masses

A team of MIT researchers has come up with a new mobile image processing chip that could bring better photos and videos to smartphones.

The chip is specifically designed to tinker with lighting, enabling much faster HDR processing than SoCs. The dedicated chip is also said to be more power efficient than all round processors. Researchers claim their new baby can process HDR images in just hundreds of milliseconds, opposed to a few seconds.

Some chipmakers, like Nvidia, have already developed their own proprietary technology to speed up HDR processing on ARM based chips, but apparently they cannot beat MIT’s dedicated chip in terms of performance and efficiency.

Thanks to speedy image processing, MIT’s chip can also do HDR video, which sounds like a great idea since smartphone videos taken in low light tend to be horrible. There’s another benefit on the photography front. The chip should vastly improve lighting in dark scenes without the need for a flash. Since most smartphones feature weak LEDs with unnaturally high light temperatures, this sounds like a welcome addition indeed.

Rather than going for bigger sensors and more elaborate optics, smartphone makers are turning to cheaper and smaller solutions, such as innovative sensors and processing techniques. MIT’s technology could find its way into smartphones sooner or later, but we still don’t know when.

You can check out the geeky details here.

 

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments