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Tuesday, 29 January 2013 10:35

Google exposes HP printers to attack

Written by Nick Farrell



Hackers take control of your copiers


Search engine Google is exposing thousands of HP printers that aren't password protected.

British blogger Adam Howard warned that all it takes is one malicious script written by a clever hacker and countless trees will die as hackers print their own bottoms on your printer. Howard points out that Google search returns about 86,800 results for publicly accessible HP printers.

Most of the printers aren't protected by a password, meaning anyone can upload a document to them via a web interface and print it remotely. When accessed remotely without a password, the printers display an array of information such as how much ink or toner they have left in them, how many pages they have printed in their lifetime and how many paper jams they have had.

A hacker could steal data which is being printed. Howard warned that companies need to lock down their printers.

Nick Farrell

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