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Friday, 04 January 2013 10:48

Ruby on Rails vulnerable

Written by Nick Farrell



SQL injection vulnerability

All of the current versions of the Ruby on Rails Web framework are shipping with a SQL injection vulnerability which means that hackers can inject code into Web applications. 

The maintainers of Ruby on Rails have released new versions that fixes the flaw, versions 3.2.10, 3.1.9 and 3.0.18 but given that it is a popular framework for developing Web apps things could get messy. The open-source framework is used by a wide variety of organisations and the flaw is in the way that dynamic finders in Active Record extract options from method parameters.

The dynamic finders in Active Record extract options from method parameters, a method parameter can mistakenly be used as a scope. This means that a dodgy request can use the scope to inject arbitrary SQL, the advisory says. All users running an affected release should either upgrade or use one of the work arounds immediately.

The advisory recommends that users running affected versions, which is essentially anyone using Ruby on Rails, upgrade immediately to one of the fixed versions, 3.2.10, 3.1.9 or 3.0.18. The vulnerability doesn't mean that all of the apps developed on vulnerable versions are susceptible to the bug.

Nick Farrell

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