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Wednesday, 26 December 2012 12:03

HTML 5 has arrived

Written by Nick Farrell



All ready go to


HTML5, which has been in the works since Roman times, is now officially "feature complete." According the standards-setting Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C). There's still some testing to be done, and it hasn't yet become an official Web standard but now it is safe to say that there won't be any new features added to HTML5.

It means that Web designers and app makers now have a "stable target" for implementing it by the time it comes a standard in 2015. The HTML5 language lets developers deliver in-the-browser experiences that previously required standalone apps or additional software like Java, Adobe's (ADBE) Flash or Microsoft's (MSFT, Fortune 500) Silverlight. It supports lightning-fast video and geolocation services, offline tools and touch, among other bells and whistles.

It has taken more than a decade for the standard to be developed. W3C CEO Jeff Jaffe said in a prepared statement said that as of today, businesses know what they can rely on for HTML5 in the coming years. "Likewise, developers will know what skills to cultivate to reach smart phones, cars, televisions, e-books, digital signs, and devices not yet known," he added.

The latest versions of Microsoft Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Apple Safari are already compatible with most HTML5 elements. W3C is already working on HTML 5.1, the first parts of which were just submitted in draft form.

Nick Farrell

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