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Monday, 19 November 2012 10:02

Shelf life of a developer same as cricketer

Written by Nick Farrell



SAP claims younger is better


SAP, the maker of software which no one really understand what it does, has stirred some controversy by claiming that younger people are more efficient developers than older ones.

V R Ferose, MD of German software major SAP's India R&D Labs said that the shelf life of a software engineer today is no more than that of a cricketer - about 15 years. He added that a 20-year-old guys (sic) provide me more value than the 35-year-olds do. The pace at which technology is changing, at 35 if you are not learning yourself, you will become redundant very quickly, Ferose said.

The problem is that technology moves so fast that there needs to be a process of continuous learning in the world of technology. All of these new computing models require architectures that are very different from those that went before, and what older people learnt in their engineering schools and training programmes.

Ferose added that after 40 people find it very difficult to be relevant because they have missed a whole learning cycle. The only way around this is to be paranoid to learn, he said.

More here.

Last modified on Monday, 19 November 2012 10:09

Nick Farrell

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