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Friday, 09 November 2012 10:20

Microsoft joins SAP-Oracle database war

Written by Nick Farrell



Begun the in-memory data war has  


Microsoft is building its SQL Server database so it will have an in-memory database to compete with the likes of SAP's Hana and Oracle's Exadata.

Codenamed “Hekaton” the new in-memory database will be under the bonnet of the next major release of SQL Server. In announcing the plan, Ted Kummert, vice president of Microsoft’s Business Platform Division, did not say when Microsoft plans to release the next major version of SQL Server.

After all it just released the last major version, SQL Server 2012, in March and it started talking about it in 2010. In-memory databases do not store data on a separate storage device attached to the server but keep it all in the system's memory. This makes them superfast.

Redmond said that when in-memory database arrives, it will work up 50 times faster and it won't require special servers, working with the ones a company already has. Oracle and SAP are selling in-memory databases now and have customers. SAP introduced Hana a little more than a year ago and says it is its fastest-selling product.

Nick Farrell

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