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Thursday, 08 November 2012 09:59

Google does not track

Written by Nick Farrell



Chrome alone


Google's latest update to its Chrome browser which brings the 'do not track' option to users.

While this move means that Google has joined major browsers who support this standard, it does risk miffing the search engine outfit's advertisers who are against the idea. Just like other browsers Google allows users to enable it, so many customers will not twig and press the right buttons.

Only Microsoft is the player which makes DNT default in it's Internet Explorer and it got a good kicking from the  advertisement industry and even from its own partner Yahoo for doing so. Google said that the effectiveness of such do not track requests is dependent on how websites and services respond, so Google is working with others on a common way to respond to these requests in the future.

Also included in the new chrome release is GPU-accelerated video decoding for Chrome on Windows. Dedicated graphics chips draw far less power than a computer's CPU, so using GPU-accelerated video decoding while watching videos can increase battery life significantly.

Nick Farrell

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