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Wednesday, 07 November 2012 10:10

x86 shipments plummet in Q3

Written by Peter Scott



Intel gains on AMD


According to Mercury Research, worldwide shipments of x86 parts saw a sharp decline in Q3. Researchers claim the drop was the biggest seen in more than a decade, 9 percent year-over-year.

Despite the drop, Intel still has something to brag about. Intel’s share hit 83.3 percent, up from 80.6 percent sequentially. AMD’s share dropped to 16.1, down from 18.8 percent, while VIA garnered a 0.6 percent share.

Mercury Research analyst Dean McCarron told PC World that both AMD and Intel experienced declines, but AMD took more of the hit than Intel.

“AMD was simply hit by what OEMs saw in the markets… and hitting the brakes,” he said.

What’s more, the third quarter is supposed to be traditionally strong for x86 chipmakers, thanks to the back-to-school shopping frenzy. However, x86 CPU shipments dropped 4 percent in Q2, followed by 9 percent in Q3. Things aren’t looking good for Q4, either.

“The key is how the macroeconomic situation is, which is not looking good for the next couple of quarters,” McCarron said. “Hopefully things will improve next year.”


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