Featured Articles

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

Apple is dancing the same dance year after year. It releases the iPhone and two days before they start shipping it…

More...
Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon has just released three new tablets starting with the $99 priced 6-inch Kindle Fire HD6. This is a 6-inch tablet…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 01 November 2012 11:55

Tokyo court gives thumbs up to Micron

Written by Nick Farrell



Can buy Elpida


Micron's plan to buy Japanese memory chipmaker Elpida was given the thumbs up by a Tokyo court after it approved the agreement and dismissed a rival plan promoted by a group of bondholders.

The bankrupt Elpida's plan to be bought by Micron has been referred to creditors for approval. The court dismissed a rival proposal by a group of bondholders, led by hedge funds Linden Advisors, Owl Creek Asset Management and Taconic Capital Advisors, who have said the $2.5-billion price tag grossly undervalues Elpida.

They argued that that the company is worth $3.78 billion. However Elpida was driven into bankruptcy by falling chip sales and foreign competition. Micron is losing money due to a crumbling PC industry, wants to create larger economies of scale and offered in early July to buy Elpida for about $750 million in cash and to pay creditors a total of $1.75 billion in annual instalments through 2019.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments