Featured Articles

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

The LG G Watch R, the first Android Wear watch with a truly round face, is coming soon and judging by…

More...
LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG has officially announced its first smartphone SoC, the NUCLUN, formerly known as the Odin.

More...
Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft has announced that it move 2.4 million consoles in fiscal year 2015 Q1. The announcement came with the latest financial…

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 11 October 2012 10:26

Apple Maps correctly identifies something

Written by Nick Farrell



Taiwan shocked


While Apple maps is considered so poor that it can't find one of Jobs' Mobs own stores, it apparently has managed to identify something it shouldn't.

Taiwan said it would ask US tech giant Apple to blur satellite images of sensitive military installations which are freely available to iPhone 5 users, should anyone want to conduct bombing runs of the island. The defence ministry was furious after the Liberty Times newspaper printed a satellite picture, downloaded with an iPhone 5.  It showed a top-secret long-range radar base in the northern county of Hsinchu.

The ministry's spokesman David Lo told reporters that it would ask Apple to lower the resolution of satellite images of some confidential military establishments. Apple has not yet received a formal request and it declined to speculate how Apple would respond.

The Hsinchu base houses a cutting-edge long-range radar procured from the United States in 2003. Construction of the radar is expected to be completed by the end of the year. It can detect  missiles launched as far away as Xinjiang in China's northwest, military officials say and it should give Taiwan minutes of extra warning in case of a Chinese missile attack.

China currently has over 1,600 ballistic missiles aimed at the island and they use something a little better than Apple maps as guidance systems.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments