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Friday, 05 October 2012 09:08

YouTube changes algorithms

Written by Nick Farrell



Stop Big Content making bogus copyright claims


Online video outfit YouTube has changed its algorithms to stop big content making bogus copyright claims on its content. The said said that it will begin manually reviewing some claims instead of the system automatically blocking disputed footage.

This comes after Michelle Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention was wrongly flagged by algorithms just after it aired. YouTube automatically put a copyright blocking message on the livestream video of the event shortly after it ended. YouTube said that to fix the issue of false positives and outright abuse of the system it had improved the algorithms that identify potentially invalid claims.

It means that claims will no longer automatically affecting user videos and place them in a queue to be manually reviewed. For a while YouTube has relied on Content ID which could be broken by overmatches or if a Big Content outfit managed to feed the filter content it doesn’t own.

Under the new rules if the uploader challenges the match, the alleged rights holder must abandon the claim or file an official takedown notice under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If Big Content lies about ownership using the DMCA they could face a fine.

Nick Farrell

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