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Monday, 24 September 2012 11:11

Intel changes its next gen introduction strategy

Written by Fuad Abazovic

intel logo new

Keeps things quiet for much
longer

Intel has changed its strategy when it comes to talking about its next generation technology. Back at IDF 2012, the company mentioned Haswell second generation 22nm CPUs and even explained some of its core technology, although it didn’t actually show any demos.

People got excited about Core i5 and Core i7 next generation Haswell parts that can ship with 10W TDP, but Intel hasn’t actually shown anything. When we asked a few people inside the company, they said that Intel isn't planning on revealing too much, as they want to surprise the competition a bit more than they used to.

It’s quite clear that Haswell has every chance to beat AMD’s including 2013 Vishera successors. Intel obviously wants to see the market's reaction to many ARM competitors, since some of them run Windows 8 RT just fine.

Intel wants to keep things secret until the time is right and the fact that Haswell is expected in the later part of Q2 2013, almost nine months from now, doesn’t help. A few years back, the IDF would have taken place in September and Intel would roll out its new architecture in the first part of Q4, a month or two after the introduction, which made sense. The fact that it has slipped its original tick tock for more than half year suggests that Intel wants to keep quiet about many Haswell details, as it still has nine months to sell Ivy Bridge Core I 3000 series.


Last modified on Monday, 24 September 2012 11:40
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