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Wednesday, 05 September 2012 10:17

Intel 3770K 3.5GHz is now an up to 3.9GHz part

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Change in processor notation

Intel has silently moved to a new processor notation for processors with Turbo Boost technology. In the past for example i7-3770K was a 3.5GHz quad-core with eight treads and maximal single turbo core to 3.9 GHz.

When you go on Intel side and check the name of this part it is now called Intel® Core™ i7-3770K Processor (8M Cache, up to 3.90 GHz). The listing is here.

Let’s concentrate on this "up to" part as now Intel quotes the higher of the two clocks hoping to get higher numbers will get more customers through the door. It is open for a debate if this is right or wrong as 3.9GHz is the maximum turbo frequency, in single-core mode, not on all four cores them together.

The reason why Intel justifies such a move is that the new frequency notation should reflect the added end user value delivered with Intel Turbo Boost technology. Here at Fudzilla we think that Core i7 3770K 3.5GHz (up to 3.9GHz with Turbo) would be a more accurate description but it’s been a while since processor manufacturers used a numbers in processor notation that actually meant anything.

The new notation only applies to Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge as well as Core i7 extreme Sandy Bridge E parts while others are unaffected, at least for the time being. We don’t want to get into the rights and wrongs of Intel’s move, but feel free to express your opinion in the comment section.

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