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Thursday, 23 August 2012 11:04

Don't bring your tablet to work

Written by Nick Farrell



Smart devices mean you work longer hours

While many employees are leaning on companies to allow them to bring their own devices to work and let them run on a network, there are some damn fine reasons why they shouldn't.

Companies are resisting letting employees plug their gear in, citing security problems, however those who have managed to squeeze a pound of flesh from those employees dumb enough to agree. According to the quarterly Mobile Workforce Report employees are working up to 20 additional hours per week unpaid as a result of bring your own device policies adopted by their firms. So if a company worked a 40 hour week before, their employes are giving them an extra 20 for free.

Compiled by enterprise Wi-Fi access firm iPass, the report shows that a third of mobile enterprise workers never fully disconnect from technology during their during personal time. Only eight percent disconnect completely from work while they are on holiday. More than 92 percent of mobile workers "enjoy their job flexibility" and are "content" with working longer hours. In fact, said the report, 42 percent would like "even greater flexibility for their working practices".

Rene Hendrikse, VP of EMEA at iPass said that BYOD is effectively turning us into a generation of productive workaholics. But iPass warned that employees run the risk of literally paying the price for this flexibility, with 18 percent shouldering their own mobile data bills, an increase of six percent from last year. So in other words not only are the employers getting slave labour, they are making their own staff pay for the privilege.

Nick Farrell

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