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Wednesday, 04 July 2012 11:01

Intel buys Israeli biometrics firm

Written by Nick Farrell



Wants to read your heart


Intel has announced the acquisition of Israeli start-up IDesia Biometrics which has some technology which can read your heartbeat.

IDesia’s proprietary technology helps identify a person because their heatbeat is unique. The technology can surpass the capabilities of fingerprint-based biometric scanners, which can be fooled easily. Exact details of the acquisition weren’t disclosed, but IDesia has raised $7 million so far.

It is possible that your laptop will check your heart to see if it will let you read your own data. It could also check your identity at an airport. IDesia founder and CEO Dr. Daniel Lange told the Israeli press the intel deal was not entirely willing one. To get into the field you need huge amounts of capital and in Israel it is difficult to raise capital for an end-use electronic product. Lange said he would rather not have sold but he recognises that it will allow the technology to reach the market far more rapidly.

Nick Farrell

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