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Wednesday, 30 May 2012 11:51

British anti-cookie law already attracts complaints

Written by Nick Farrell



That is the way it all crumbles


The UK has just bought in a law which demands that websites give users the option of opting out of collecting cookies on sites they visit.

The law has been enforced and already the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has received 64 separate complaints about potential cookie law violations in two days. An ICO spokesperson said that the complaints were not necessarily for different websites, but was not saying which sites were involved.

In fact you could take your pick.  Many sites, including government ones have not adapted to the new law. The ICO has already made it public that it will not be taking a hard line if companies are not compliant with the law. When complaints are made, the data protection watchdog will look into what the business has done to get in line. If the company can show it is working on a solution, the ICO will not punish them.

If the ICO thinks a breach of the law is serious enough, it can fine up to £500,000. But it has never issued a fine anywhere close to that amount before.

Nick Farrell

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