Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 28 May 2012 21:19

Gainward GTX 670 Phantom 2GB tested - Conclusion

Written by Sanjin Rados

thumbtop-value-2008-lr

Review: Worthy GTX 680 substitute














GTX 670 Phantom 2GB is Gainward’s premium model for gamers and enthusiasts, which is pretty much clear from the fact that it runs at reference GTX 680’s clocks. The memory and 256-bit system are common for both of these cards, whereas Phantom actually has slightly faster memory. Still, that wasn’t enough to beat the GTX 680, which has eight SMX units and 1536 CUDA cores. GTX 670 on the other hand has seven SMX units and 1344 CUDA cores.

At the end of the day though, Gainward GTX 670 Phantom has every reason to stand proud because it showed excellent performance. In fact, on few occasions it even manages to beat the GTX 680.

We’ve seen that there’s some overclocking headroom left as well, even despite the already high GPU overclock to 1006MHz. Thanks to our overclock, Gainward GTX 670 Phantom even managed to beat GTX 680 in Crysis 2 by 4 percent. Gainward will also provide you with its upgraded card management tool ExperTool II.

The only thing that didn’t impress us is the Phantom cooler, which is what the card should be notable for. Performance wise, it beats the reference GTX 670’s solution, but noise levels are about the same. That’s not to say that it’s very loud, but we can’t say it’s inaudible either. Despite the overclocked core, we’d still much rather see Gainward keep the tradition of making coolers that beat reference solutions in both cooling and noise departments.

If you’re yearning for GTX 680’s performance but can’t quite afford it, then Gainward’s GTX 670 Phantom will save you some €50 while delivering comparable performance. You can improve its score even more if you’re into tweaking, which makes the card one sweet package. 


fudz topvalue ny

(Page 13 of 13)
Last modified on Thursday, 21 June 2012 21:42
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments