Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 24 May 2012 14:41

Apple will fight for the right to screw over customers

Written by Nick Farrell



Ebook cartel was good for them


Jobs' Mob has announced that it will fight for its right to run a cartel which jacked up the price of ebooks for its customers.

Jobs himself bragged in his biography that the deal negotiated with the publishing houses would lead to users paying more. However Apple is now rejecting charges that it conspired to fix prices of electronic books, calling the U.S. government's antitrust lawsuit a "fundamentally flawed."

In a filing in U.S. District Court in Manhattan late Tuesday, Apple said it has not conspired with anyone or fixed prices for e-books in an effort to thwart Amazon.com dominance of the market. The Justice Department said Apple colluded with five big publishers to force up e-book prices in early 2010, Apple launched its keyboardless netbook.

Amazon, which makes the Kindle e-reader, sold e-books for as little as $9.99. Jobs wanted to offer publishers a means to boost prices, and "create a real mainstream e-books market at $12.99 and $14.99." Apple argues that since it created its glorious tablet it had  fuelled demand for e-books by forcing Amazon and rivals, including Barnes & Noble, to compete more aggressively.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments