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Thursday, 10 May 2012 13:09

Movie industry proves that it snorts too much coke

Written by Nick Farrell



Makes DVDs even less attractive


The movie industry has just worked out that the way to stop piracy and improve the falling DVD sales is to make them even less attractive to customers. The MPAA and the DHS have teamed up to punish all those who legally buy DVDs by giving them twice as many unskippable anti-piracy warnings.

One has a Homeland Security Investigations “special agent” badge next to the FBI badge, as well as a screen telling you that "digital theft harms the economy." It also invites you to visit a taxpayer-funded website that spits out Big Contents figures about how pirates stuffed up the entertainment industry and not its bad decisions.

It is worthwhile pointing out that the only people who have to suffer this form of brainwashing are the people who are actually supporting the real product. Pirates can safely delete the copyright notices from their versions of the products. It is unlikely that anyone who buys a DVD is really going to want to sit through someone threatening them for a crime they did not commit and will probably just wait for the video to turn up on pirate bay instead.

So once again, Big Content has made the pirate products more attractive than its own.

Nick Farrell

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