Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 24 April 2012 12:44

Apple gear suffering from malware

Written by Nick Farrell



Users still think they are invulnerable


After years of Apple users claiming that their machines were more secure than Windows, it turns out that they just did not know what malware looked like.

Insecurity experts at Sophos say that there is a disturbingly high level of malware on Mac computers. After looking at 100,000 Mac computers running its free anti-virus software, Sophos discovered that 1 in 5 Mac computers had installed malware. While the machines would not cause symptoms of the Malware unless users also run Windows on their computer, it could still be spread to other computers.

More disturbingly, Sophos's analysis also shows that 2.7 per cent of Macs were found to be carrying Mac OS X malware. Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos said that Mac users need a loud wake-up call about the growing malware problem on their computers.  Actually we think they need a good shaking and a clip around the ear with the hammer.

Part of the problem is that mac users are so technologically illiterate that they think a nice case means that a computer is good. For years there had been a myth that Steve Jobs's superior security was protecting the machines from infection when it was more luck and the fact that the writers of malware did not target mac users because they had nothing on their machines worth stealing.

Fake anti-virus attacks, which scare users into handing over their credit card details, and the recent 600,000 strong Flashback botnet dominate the chart of Mac-based threats.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments