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Friday, 02 March 2012 19:20

Italians discover pasta shaped radio waves

Written by Nick Farrell



Fusilli provides an infinate number of channels


Italian boffins have solved the problem of radio congestion by twisting radio waves into the shape of fusilli pasta.

They have demonstrated the technology, which means that you can have an infinite number of channels broadcast and received in real-life conditions across the waters of Venice. According to the Institute of Physics and German Physical Society's New Journal of Physics which we get for the cross the quark competition,  lead author Dr Fabrizio Tamburini from the University of Padova, Italy devised a solution to this by manipulating waves so that they can hold more than one channel of information.

Apparently a wave can twist about its axis a certain number of times in either a clockwise or anti-clockwise direction, meaning there are several configurations that it can adopt. A phase twist looks like a fusillli-pasta-shaped beam, only there are a limited number of sauces that can go on it. Each of these twisted beams can be independently generated, propagated and detected even in the very same frequency band, behaving as independent communication channels," Tamburini continued.

Nick Farrell

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