Featured Articles

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

We have been hearing reports of a new breed of affordable Windows notebooks for months. It is alleged that a number…

More...
AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD has officially launched its first ever SSDs and all three are part of AMD’s AMD Radeon R7 SSD series.

More...
KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

Android 4.4 is now running on more than a fifth of Android devices, according to Google’s latest figures.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 29 February 2012 12:26

Hackers hit US business mediation and arbitration service

Written by Nick Farrell



Peacemakers are not blessed


Insecurity outfit Symantec has noticed a new wave of cyber-attacks designed to impersonate a well-known business mediation and arbitration service in the US.

Businesses are being targeted with emails purporting to originate from the US Better Business Bureau, socially engineered to suggest that a complaint had been filed against the organisation and the details of the complaint could be found in the file attachment, which would lead to a PDF file that contains an embedded executable or a URL that leads to the malware.

The attacks are similar to those first reported in 2007, when C-level business executives were being targeted with emails that purported to originate from the US Better Business Bureau (BBB). What is strange is that the new wave of attacks bear similar social engineering techniques to the 2007 attacks.

Behind the seens there is some much cleverer hacking techniques, including server-side polymorphism. Server-side polymorphism enables the attacker to generate a unique strain of malware for each use, in order to evade detection by traditional anti-virus security software. Scripts such as PHP are commonly used on the attacker’s Web site to generate the malicious code on-the-fly.

Like the Greek sea-god, Proteus, the continually transforming nature of these attacks makes them very difficult to recognise and detect using more traditional signature-based defenses.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments