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Wednesday, 22 February 2012 12:18

Suicide man nothing to do with Olympus scandal

Written by Nick Farrell



Had nothing to do with figures


The Olympus executive found hanging in a park in India had no link to the Japanese endoscope maker's accounting scandal.

Tsutomu Omori, 49, head of the firm's medical equipment business in India, was found hanged outside his apartment in suburban Delhi in an apparent suicide. Olympus told Reuters that there was no immediate suggestion his death was tied to the $1.7 billion fraud that has rocked corporate Japan and led to the arrest of senior executives in Tokyo.

The Olympus spokeswoman said that it would be difficult to see how he could have been involved as Omori was a salesman who had been out of Japan for a long time. She said that he was never involved in the financial area of Olympus and was not a target of investigation by Olympus's third-party panel and other panels that the firm has set up, she said.

But she added that the the company would not know whether he was being investigated or approached by police and prosecutors. Police in India, two handwritten notes, one in Japanese and the other in English, were discovered at Omori's home. The English note read, "I am sorry for bothering you," while the note in Japanese had yet to be translated.

Nick Farrell

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