Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 28 March 2008 07:15

State of Washington goes on offense against RFID misuse

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Enacts law in advance


The State of Washington has enacted a new law to address potential misuse of information gained through RFID technology.  Under Washington State Senate Bill 1031, it is a Class C felony to use radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to spy on someone.  This means that it will be a criminal offense to intentionally scan someone’s ID remotely without their knowledge and to use it for an illegal purpose, such as fraud or identity theft.  The new law also includes facial recognition technology.

Washington issued new State drivers’ licenses in December which use RFID enhanced technology.  These licenses have RFID tags and can be used in place of a passport at the U.S.-Canadian border. The law was enacted in advance of potential abuse with the intent of protecting people’s privacy.

The new law becomes effective in July.  It is aimed at the act of skimming or lifting information from RFID tags without the owner being aware of it, for example, at a crowded outdoor restaurant where a reader is used to scan several RFID cards in the area.

Last modified on Friday, 28 March 2008 15:16

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments