Featured Articles

IDC says PC market is rebounding

IDC says PC market is rebounding

Research firm IDC has published its latest report into the state of the PC market and while there are some signs…

More...
TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC, the world’s biggest chip foundry for hire, has reportedly stepped up development of its 10nm manufacturing process.

More...
Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

A while ago we mentioned that Broadwell won’t show up in the desktop space this year and we got it right.…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

The EVGA GTX 780 Classified has been dethroned as the company’s fastest non-Titan card following the introduction of the GTX 780…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 27 January 2012 13:04

iPhone thieves are big fans of Apple's customer service

Written by Nick Farrell



They are so helpful


Apple's service programme, which replaces broken iPhones, is being used by criminals to launder stolen machines, According Reuters there is a growing trend of stolen iPhones being taken to Apple, as if broken, for either replacement or a discount on a new unit.

Robert Siciliano, who works for McAfee said that Apple did not seem to realise that the gear is stolen devices and instead is relying on the honour system. He said that the honour system is devised with the mindset that we are all sheep and there are no wolves. We can see how Apple makes the mistake.  It flogs stuff to sheep who buy what ever they tell them every year, so it does not expect someone to do something as clever as exploit its systems.

Siciliano says he has known of this problem for a while, but doesn't see any immediate solution. Until consumers scream loud enough about this issue, Apple probably won't do anything about it. One case which makes interesting reading is MIT graduate student Kayla Menard who had her iPhone snatched it from her hand.

A few days later she received an automated email that her damaged phone was repaired at an Apple Store and could she pick it up. She went to the store to try to get back her phone, but they wouldn't hand it over to her.  As far as Apple was concerned the thief was the owner.  As it turned out Apple had sold the thief a new phone at a discount.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments