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Friday, 20 January 2012 22:30

Haier unveils completely wireless 55-inch LCD HDTV

Written by Jon Worrel

haier logo

Zero cables, powered by magnetic resonance

During the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, one of the HDTV booths we were unfortunately unable to visit was demonstrating a completely wireless 55-inch LCD HDTV only powered by magnetic resonance frequencies. Yes, that's right, the display does not require any cable connections physically protruding out of the display itself.

Haier's "completely wireless" 55-inch LCD HDTV sends and receives uncompressed / lossless video and audio content over a Wireless Home Digital Interface (WHDI) at rates of up to 3Gbps. In addition, it receives power to and from a separate power transmitter that must be placed no more than 8-inches away from the display. Of course, this is the catch to the company's "completely wireless" marketing agenda, yet the product still remains impressive for its ability to almost completely conceal any bulky HDMI cables and A/C power adapters.

If it weren't for the rather bulky stand beneath the display that supports it in place, it could have been aesthetically appealing as a somewhat large, "completely wireless" wall-mounted HDTV. 

Source: The Verge 

Last modified on Friday, 20 January 2012 22:45

Jon Worrel

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