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Monday, 26 December 2011 11:28

Sony has paper-powered battery

Written by Nick Farell



Everything is paper in Japan


Sony has created a new battery which generates electricity by turning shredded paper into sugar which in turn is used as fuel.

It means that the great unwashed will be able to top up their mobile devices by raiding the waste paper basket. Bio-batteries are environmentally friendly as they did not use harmful chemicals or metals.  Sony was showing them off at the Eco-Products exhibition in Tokyo last week.

According to the BBC employees invited children to drop piece of paper and cardboard into a liquid made up of water and enzymes, and then to shake it. The equipment was connected to a small fan which began spinning a few minutes later. It works by using the enzyme cellulase to decompose the materials into glucose sugar. These were then combined with oxygen and further enzymes which turned the material into electrons and hydrogen ions.

More here.

Nick Farell

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