Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 21 December 2011 12:28

Ivy Bridge goes 300MHz faster at same TDP

Written by Fuad Abazovic



Graphics much faster


It looks like Intel’s Ivy Bridge can offer a significant clock increase in the popular 65W TDP mid-range TDP envelope.

The new Core i5 3450S series will launch at 2.8GHz and in case it users need more performance, it will jump to 3.5GHz clock through the magic of Turbo. On paper, this CPU seems like the direct successor to the Core i5 2400S, which works at 2.5GHz and with Turbo jumps to 3.3GHz.

Since Ivy Bridge has much better graphics, it turns out that Intel saved quite a few watts on these new CPUs. This market segment gets interesting especially for users who would like to have quiet machines, myself included.

Naturally high end parts, including Sandy Bridge E and late in 2012 Ivy Bridge E chips, will feature 130W TDPs in order to pull of some great scores. Regular Ivy Bridge parts should stick to a maximum of 95W. It gets interesting as we’ve seen a new part Core i5 3450 with four cores four threads, clocked at 3.1GHz / 3.5GHz that jumps into the new 77W TDP envelope. It replaces the Core i5 2400 with the same clocks, but with a 95W TDP.

You don’t need a calculator to realize that you can save some 18W with these new parts, and probably save a bush or some sort of forest critter in the Amazon in the process.

Overall, Ivy Bridge promises significant improvements over Sandy Bridge, which is a pretty good architecture in its own right.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments