Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 16 December 2011 12:20

Europeans not interested in Nokia's Windows phone

Written by Nick Farell



Lumia reception does not bode well


European consumers show little interest in Nokia's first smartphone using Microsoft's Windows Phone software.

According to a survey by Exane BNP Paribas only 2.2 percent of surveyed buyers firmly intending to purchase the Lumia, Nokia's first flagship Windows Phone is pretty much doomed. Analyst Alexander Peterc slashed his view on sales of the Lumia to end-users to just 800,000 from its initial "ballpark estimate" of 2 million.  In other words about the same as  with launch-quarter sales of between 3.5 million and 4 million for Nokia's previous flagship, the N8.

Exane BNP Paribas cut its price target on Nokia shares to 3.30 euros from 3.70 euros and stuck to its "underperform" rating on the stock. There is a lot riding on both Nokia and Microsoft doing well out of their partnership together. If it fails then Microsoft will lose the mobile market and Nokia will go under.

The brokerage surveyed 1,300 consumers in the five markets where the Lumia 800 had gone on sale in the week started December 5, but narrowed the sample to 456 who had declared an intention to purchase a smartphone in the next month.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments