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Wednesday, 14 December 2011 10:15

Analyst touts Apple as next big chip player

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Intel failing to keep up in mobile


The shift to smartphones and tablets has placed Intel and AMD in an awkward predicament, as smaller and relatively new chip designers are starting to capitalize on the plucky ARM architecture.

Piper Jaffray analyst Gus Richard believes Apple is one of the companies that stands to greatly benefit from the trend, which is hardly surprising as it was Apple who revamped the smartphone and tablet marked with the iPhone and iPad.

Richard claims Moore’s Law and raw performance should no longer be used as a benchmark, since the emphasis is now on user experience, power consumption, cost, and perhaps most importantly, software. Although Apple A-series chips, or any ARM based chips for that matter, don’t come close to x86 parts in terms of performance, they can offer a superior user experience, he argues.

It all boils down to this combination of factors. Although ARM chips don’t offer much in the performance department, they run optimized operating systems that allow them to offer a good user experience on mobile devices. Couple that with their relatively low cost and great power efficiency and you end up with a pretty competitive package.

So far the tablet and to some extent smartphone markets have largely been dominated by Apple’s iOS and A-series chips, but Android is playing an increasingly important role, although it still lags behind in tablets. With the advent of Windows 8, Redmond could also get a big chunk of the market.

However, as far as plain PCs are concerned, the x86 architecture will be with us for years to come.

More here.


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Comments  

 
+7 #1 ph0b0s 2011-12-14 12:22
I'm sorry but this story is stupid. Apple don't make or even design their own chips. They just add things on to ARM designs. ARM a company they sold their stake in may years ago.

It is ARM based chips with modifications from Nvidia, Qualcomm, Samsung, etc that are giving Intel a beating in the mobile arena. There are more Apple modified ARM chips on the market than there are Apple modified ARM chips.

For Apple their market share in mobiles and tablets has been decreasing due to Androids increase in share.

As per usual an analyst has got Apple tunnel vision and has missed the reality of things. Apple is not a chip competitor to Intel, ARM.
 
 
+2 #2 Bl0bb3r 2011-12-14 16:49
That analyst has an iphone 4 up his anal tract... I thought the iphone 4 doesn't vibrate. No, wait, there's an app for that!

You're right ph0b0s, but the argument isn't how Apple compete head to head with Intel or AMD, it's how much they can benefit from flogging those, mostly useless, pieces of hardware. You've seen the first time ipad came out, there was a buying frenzy, but after that people were like, "why the f*** did I buy this?". If anything at all, the market will become saturated and it will stall, or to put it in American terms, the bubble will burst.
 

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