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Wednesday, 07 December 2011 12:45

Amazon in hot water over Kindle Fire

Written by Nick Farell

Amazon Logo

That should be steam

Amazon's Kindle Fire tablet, has apparently angered parents who think that the gadget makes it too easy for their children to buy stuff they like.

The Kindle Fire comes with your Amazon account information preloaded, along with "1-Click" ordering. That means anyone who is holding that device can place an order, whether it's their account or not. No prompts come up to confirm the purchase or ask for a password.

Scenic Labs founder Jason Rosenfeld said his three year old daughter using the device and clicked on an image of a children's product that appeared on the screen because it was in his shopping history. Of course, in a world where everything revolves around breeding and protecting breeders spawn so that they can populate the gene pool with more over protected runts, this a major problem.

No one thinks “shit don't give a three year old a tablet, she will be happy with a soft toy”. Instead Amazon is in trouble for not configuring its tablet in case some dippy parent gives a tablet to a toddler.

Of course, Reuters points out that would never happen to an Apple parent as there are all sorts of toddler protections on its gear. With Apple gear you just have to worry about yourself over spending within its walled gardens of delights and the three-fold more expensive price tag.

In an email in response to questions from Reuters about Kindle Fire, Amazon did not address concerns about the "1-Click" ordering, but says it has provided the ability for parents to limit what their kids buy when using applications downloaded for the devices. Kurt Roemer, chief security strategist for Citrix Systems, says parents and other users should understand what the Kindle Fire is and how it works before letting anyone use one.

In short don't give it to your stupid bubble-wrapped brat.

More here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 07 December 2011 14:27
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