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Tuesday, 15 November 2011 11:10

US Senate faces the wrath of Bieber

Written by Nick Farell

y lawbookhammer

This will cost them

Senator Amy Klobuchar's fairly blatant attempt to hand over more constitutional powers to her chums in the record companies appears to have backfired after she had ended up taking on the one of the biggest youth icons in the US.

Short of insulting Twilight, Klobuchar has effectively created a law which would have resulted in Justin Bieber being locked up in a prison for singing a song on You Tube.

Now normally any law that involved Justin Bieber being locked up for singing would have gotten our vote, particularly if it could also include Craig David, Celine Dion and James Blunt, but in this case the Bieber has a point.

Bieber became famous by posting videos of his covers of other artists'

songs on YouTube, exposing him to potential prosecution if this legislation passes.  He was recently asked what he thought about Klobuchar's proposal, and his answer couldn't have been more dead-on:

"Whoever she is, she needs to know that I'm saying she needs to be locked up - put away in cuffs." He added, "People need to have the freedom... people need to be able to sing songs. I just think that's ridiculous."

Klobuchar's law will actually make it only legal to hum a tune in the presence of witnesses if you pay the RIAA a sum of money.

Needless to day Civil liberties activst groups Demand Progress and Fight for the Future announced that they are teaming up to air an ad that's critical of Senator Amy Klobuchar's (D-MN) Internet censorship legislation, S.978.

They have just spent money on an advert which may be viewed here.

It will air on cable news and Comedy Central throughout Minneapolis and Saint Paul at least through this week -- the same week that HR.3261, the House companion to Klobuchar's S.978, is heard before the House Judiciary Committee.

According to Demand Progress executive director David Segal, "We're running this ad for one simple reason:  We need to embarrass a key lawmaker to set an example for others, and make it clear that it's not okay to shill for the entertainment industry at the expense of ordinary American's civil liberties."  He continued,  "Hollywood has gobs of money, and that means that they have undue clout in DC.  Lawmakers love sponsoring Hollywood bills because it means untold thousands of new dollars for their campaign coffers.  Ads like this will make them think twice."

 

Nick Farell

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