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Friday, 07 October 2011 09:10

Epic announces Unreal Engine 3 support for Flash Player 11

Written by Slobodan Simic
epic_logo

UE3 comes to web browsers
Just a few days after announcing support for OS X, Epic has announced that its Unreal Engine 3 will have support for the latest Adobe Flash Player 11, bringing the popular engine to browsers.

Epic Games CEO, Founder and Technical Director, Tim Sweeney has already displayed the Unreal Engine 3, or to be precise, Unreal Tournament 3, running on Adobe Flash Player 11 during the keynote at Adobe Max 2011 conference. Unreal Engine 3 will use the new Flash Player's hardware-accelerated Stage 3D APIs that, according to Epic, allow 1,000 times faster 2D and 3D graphics rendering performance when compared to the Flash Player 10.

Those that have bougth the UE3 licence will be able to access these new features that will hopefully bring some serious 3D games to the Web and browsers.

Last modified on Friday, 07 October 2011 09:49
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Comments  

 
+1 #1 thematrix606 2011-10-07 10:45
I though Flash was dieing, and HTML5 was the new king? xD
 
 
+2 #2 Squall_Leonhart 2011-10-07 16:26
Quoting thematrix606:
I though Flash was dieing, and HTML5 was the new king? xD


WebGL and CSS3D don't even compare to stage3D
 
 
0 #3 JAB Creations 2011-10-09 09:05
Quoting thematrix606:
I though Flash was dieing, and HTML5 was the new king? xD



No, the MPEG-LA patent pool (e.g. patent and licensing trolls) are trying to force the H.264 (sounds like a virus doesn't it?) down everyone's throats. Since Apple and Microsoft are both part of the patent tro...pool they have refused to support codecs that are free to implement and use.

So since Mozilla (who makes Firefox) and Opera ASA (who makes Opera) don't want to spend millions to implement H.264 support and responsible web designers such as myself refuse to use it (even though DivX and Xvid rock) to get a cross-browser implementation of a video presentation we will be forced to use Flash up to and including the 2030s. More in second post...
 
 
0 #4 JAB Creations 2011-10-09 09:11
[part 2/4]

The problem of supporting H.264 is that the licensing fees are passed on to implementers, not users though they still exist. To keep corporations from gaining excessive influence on the web (e.g. eventually requiring you to personally pay for licensing rights to be able to decode (e.g. watch) videos in your browser) browser vendors such as Mozilla and Opera refuse to pay tens of millions of dollars and they have every justification to refuse.

Avoiding patent argument essentially the MPEG-LA trol...pool can choose to effectively sue and win against any other entity that attempts to use patented technology. That means corporations are responsible for preventing DivX or Xvid TYPE (not level) competitors that are free.
 
 
0 #5 JAB Creations 2011-10-09 09:16
[part 3/4]

I wanted to clarify about the TYPE (not level) bit of my last post. Different TYPES of videos contain different CONTEXTS of content (just as different formats of pictures use different formats (gif, png, jpg).

High motion videos may use one encoding process (or a mixture of one set) while videos where someone sitting and the background does not change may use different processing...notice when skipping in to a video the video doesn't entirely update all the time?

Abuse of the patent system holds certain technologies hostage until the patent expires and THEN competing products can implement those same methods.

IE9 will be supported in Windows 7 until 2020 and IE10 VERY likely won't have open codec support.
 
 
0 #6 JAB Creations 2011-10-09 09:36
[part 4/4]

To understand why we'll be stuck with Flash for such a long time it's also important to understand Microsoft's policy on supporting software for way too long. Internet Explorer 9 does not support open codecs (it does if you install it but do you really trust that someone who is using IE in the first place DID that?) and IE10 very likely will not either. How long will Microsoft support Windows 8...until the mid-2020s if not longer? Windows 7 extended support expires on January 14, 2020. M$ trolls Google by making licensing money off of Google Android devices, so 2030+.

What people CAN do to fight off Flash is migrate users from Windows to Linux as if you stick to the basics Linux works for most people.
 

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