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Wednesday, 28 September 2011 11:25

Intel, IBM and Globalfoundries build R&D hub

Written by Nick Farell
intel_logo_newglobalfoundries

Looking for things to come
Rival chipmakers Intel, IBM, and Globalfoundries are working together to invest in a $4.4 billion R&D hub in New York. The five-year investment will target New York State, which is already a major centre of chip research and development activity tied to Biggish Blue and Globalfoundries.

The first project will focus on making the next two generations of computer chips. This will be mostly controlled by IBM.

The second project is a joint effort by Intel, IBM, TSMC, Globalfoundries and Samsung, will focus on moving existing 300mm wafer manufacturing technology to more advanced 450mm tech. 450mm wafers yield roughly twice the number of chips as today's 300mm wafers, which lowers the cost of making future chips.


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