Featured Articles

IDC says PC market is rebounding

IDC says PC market is rebounding

Research firm IDC has published its latest report into the state of the PC market and while there are some signs…

More...
TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC, the world’s biggest chip foundry for hire, has reportedly stepped up development of its 10nm manufacturing process.

More...
Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

A while ago we mentioned that Broadwell won’t show up in the desktop space this year and we got it right.…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

The EVGA GTX 780 Classified has been dethroned as the company’s fastest non-Titan card following the introduction of the GTX 780…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 12 September 2011 13:40

Designer gets a snog from his phone

Written by Nick Farell
y_questionmark

A kiss is just a kiss
A design researcher at the Berlin University of the Arts, Germany, has worked out a a way to get a snog out of his phone. Fabian Hemmert, has developed a series of phone prototypes that can transmit grasping, breathing or even kissing.

Showing off his phone at the Mobile HCIconference in Stockholm, Sweden, Hemmert demonstated force sensors on the phone's sides and a strap which the user places over their hand. When a person grips their phone it sends a signal to a motor in the other phone that pulls the strap tighter. Breathing transmits air movement, with a pressure sensor on one side and a jet on the other.

The Kissing prototype gas moisture sensor on the sender's phone and a motorised wet sponge that pushes against a semi-permeable membrane on the receiver's phone. The extent to which the sponge moves depends on the wetness of the sender's kiss, letting you distinguish between a peck on the cheek and a full-on slobber. The description is similar to the kiss I got when I was 15 from a very strange girl who held me down so I could not escape.

Needless to say Hemmert's colleagues think the new means of communication "creepy", "awkward", "disturbing" and "disgusting" but hell, they were German students so it probably was a good night out for them.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments