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Thursday, 18 August 2011 10:33

South Koreans baying for Apple blood

Written by Nick Farell
apple

Surely that should be juice
More than 27,000 South Koreans have signed up for a class-action lawsuit against Apple accusing the company of privacy violations regarding location data stored on the owners' iPhones. The  $26 million suit was officially filed in Changwon District Court yesterday.

According to  Associated Press, each person wants Jobs' Mob to write a cheque for $932 in damages. Kim Hyeong-seok, one of their attorneys, said that the suit targets Apple and its South Korean unit to "protect privacy" rights. The claim is that the location-tracking feature on the iPhone inflicted emotional distress on the device owners who are already under enough stress, having been identified by their mates as being dumb enough to own one of the shiny toys.

Apple denied tracking iPhone users, claiming the data collected in the unencrypted file was merely information on cell tower and Wi-Fi network locations.  Later it admitted that there was a software glitch which prompted iPhones to send anonymous location data to Apple servers from devices whose location services were disabled.


Nick Farell

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