Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 29 July 2011 11:49

Windows XP has 75 percent of rootkits

Written by Nick Farell
xp

Upgrade dammit
The AVAST Virus Lab has identified un-patched and often pirated versions of Windows XP as the main vector for rootkits infections.

Data from a six-month study catalogued over 630,000 samples and found that 74 per cent of infections originated from Windows XP machines, compared to 17 per cent for Vista and only 12 per cent from Windows 7 machines. While Windows XP may be old, it is still the most common operating system around the globe with 49 per cent of Avast! antivirus users having it on their computers compared to the 38 per cent with Windows 7 and the 13 per cent with Vista.

Przemyslaw Gmerek, the AVAST expert on rootkits and lead researcher said that one issue with Windows XP is the high number of pirated versions, especially as users are often unable to properly update them because the software can’t be validated by the Microsoft update. Because of the way root kits attack and stay concealed, deep in the operation system, rootkits are a perfect weapon for stealing private data.

More recent operating systems like Windows 7 are more resilient to rootkits, but not immune, he said.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+3 #1 eugen 2011-07-29 13:58
die hard xp
 
 
+3 #2 redunion1940 2011-07-29 17:28
XP the new IE 6

Also does this mean Microsoft was correct about pirated version being dangerous? haha, seriously using XP now is just unintelligent.
 
 
+3 #3 dicobalt 2011-07-29 20:40
I guess those users haven't learned how to pirate Win7.
 
 
-1 #4 RawThinkTank 2011-07-31 11:52
i agree, microsoft must update Xp rootkit
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments