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Wednesday, 13 July 2011 14:35

Google knew that Android violated some Oracle patents

Written by Nick Farell


Judge William Alsup thinks it is possible
A judge overseeing the Google versus Oracle case thinks it is possible that Google possibly knew the Android OS violated certain Oracle Java patents, but pressed ahead anyway.

Judge William Alsup made the statement in connection with the so-called Daubert motion Google has filed in hopes of excluding the findings of Oracle's damages expert. Alsup wrote that it appears possible that early on Google recognized that it would infringe patents protecting at least part of Java. It entered into negotiations with Sun Microsystems to obtain a license for use in Android, then abandoned the negotiations as too expensive, and pushed home with Android without any license at all.

If the scenario was true then the court has to decide if some of the claims if valid and how it should  affect the damages analysis. Oracle gained control of Java through its purchase of Sun Microsystems and sued Google last year. It claims Android violates seven of its Java patent and it wants $6.1 billion.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
-1 #1 Jermelescu 2011-07-13 23:00
Problem, Google?
 
 
-3 #2 Shadow187 2011-07-14 00:21
Quoting Jermelescu:
Problem, Google?

*Problem, Java?
 
 
+1 #3 pogsnet 2011-07-14 04:44
$6billion?!?!?

So expensive and I believe Andriod OS dont earn no near $1billion mark.

This Patent troll sucks bigtime. It blocks innovation they should think pricing it on how much effort needed to discover that not by how much the company feels pricing it.
 
 
-1 #4 robert3892 2011-07-14 08:26
Google entered initial negotiations with Sun for a patent license and the abandoned the negotiations. If Google has indeed stolen the patents then they should pay up big time and if Google is found guilty in court the judge should block the Android OS use until a license is made with Oracle.
 
 
0 #5 Exodite 2011-07-14 09:59
This goes against what little information I've read on the subject before.

As I've understood the issue some test-oriented code made it into a contribution subcategory that included unattributed Sun code.

However, this was removed from subsequent releases before Oracle even initiated the suit.

If there's any other, allegedly, infringing issues I've yet to hear them mentioned. It'd be nice for Oracle to stop beating around the bush and come out and say what exactly is the problem.
 

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