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Thursday, 14 July 2011 06:20

Cooler Master NotePal Infinite EVO tested - 4. Test Results

Written by Sanjin Rados
EVO-front-thumb

Review: It can be better

The picture below shows Acer’s 5745DG 15.6’’ notebook on the NotePal Infinite EVO. You can see that the laptop’s edges slightly exceed those of the EVO.  Cooler Master’s specs say that optimum size is between 12’’ and 15.4’’. We already said that a 17 incher will fit, but it will not be a very pretty sight.

EVO-test1

So, the Infinite EVO looks modern but does it get the cooling job done? Unfortunately, we didn’t think it stood out in that respect. Cooler Master says that the unique U shape will help improve cooling by up to 20 percent, but it doesn’t say which notebook they used for testing. In fact, we didn’t manage to recreate Cooler Master’s results with our Acer 5745DG. We suppose that the Infinite EVO will work best with average size notebooks (about 13’’). Unfortunately, we had no smaller laptop at the time of our testing.

EVO-front-3

Since we measured only minimum temperature difference with and without the EVO, we tried to take our Acer’s battery out and try again. However, temperatures remained unchanged.

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The following photo shows temperatures after our Prime95 ‘blend’ testing. The first screenshot is with Infinite EVO, while the second is without.

Infinite_EVO_min_i_max
Infinite EVO

Acer_na_podu_bez_batrije_min_i__max
Acer5745DG

As you can see, the Infinite EVO didn’t really help much.

Noise and Inside look

Here are a couple of pictures showing the Infinite EVO’s innards.

EVO-front-inside1

Tearing the EVO apart in order to reach the fans is a long and complicated procedure (many hard to reach screws).

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EVO-front-inside2

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The Infinite EVO comes with two 80mm fans (B9225-14RA-2in-F1) that run from 700 to 1400RPM. Maximum RPM produces a noise of 23 dBA. While the RPM regulator may make it quieter, the fans were buzzing all the time. Needless to say, it’s not something we particularly liked and although it’s not overly loud, it’s loud enough to bother us. Since the buzzing noise can be heard from both fans, it’s clear that it’s not an isolated malfunction.

EVO-front-inside4



Design
Continued

We already said that Infinite EVO is comfortable to work with from your lap. We liked the fact that air flows downwards as well, and you’ll definitely appreciate it in hot summer days. Unfortunately, as much as the futuristic look makes it attractive, it didn’t show much on the cooling field.

Good thing about the design is that cabling can be hidden inside the device. Namely, there’s a cable channel between the aluminum plate and the plastic part all the way around the device, which will definitely come in handy for cable management.

EVO-test-usb

EVO-test-usb2

We must also add that the 10cm cable is too short to be routed through the channel to the other side of a notebook. The following picture shows that best.

EVO-test-usb3

We checked the user’s manual and were pretty surprised to see the cable connected they way we wanted to but couldn’t. Somebody probably saved a few cents here, unfortunately at users’ expense.

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(Page 4 of 5)
Last modified on Thursday, 14 July 2011 09:04
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