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Wednesday, 29 June 2011 11:02

Google's revenge on Taiwanese government

Written by Nick Farell


Users suffer
Search outfit Google has been caught by the press doing evil in Taiwan.

The Taiwanese government wanted the various app stores to obey its consumer laws which allowed a product to be returned within seven days if a person is not happy with it. Fair enough, you would think. Even Apple, which has been having a long spat with the EU about its consumer law agreed to it. Not Google. When the outfit refused to obey the law, the Taipei government fined it US$34,550. Google flung its toys out of the pram and shut down the paid application section of the Android Market in Taiwan leaving its customers high and dry.

Clearly the outfit was telling Taiwan that it was not a jelly, nor spongy so don't try to trifle with it. Google Taiwan said it was suspending paid apps in Taiwan while we continue to discuss this issue with the Taipei City Government. However what is there to discuss? Either Google obeys a fairly reasonable consumer law, or it withdraws from doing business in Taiwan. Google believes that 15 minutes is all the time that a user needs to work out if the Application is acceptable or not. It said that this reflects the fact that apps are delivered over-the-air instantly and most users who request a refund could do so within minutes of their purchase.

It claims that this policy helps consumers make educated decisions about the apps they buy, while enabling Taiwanese developers to manage their businesses effectively, a SpokesGoogle said. The Taiwan government said that that Google's suspension of its App store was an attempt to coerce Taiwanese to give up their consumer rights.

It is demanding that Google submit an “improvisation plan” by the end of the week. It is thinking of making a second penalty against the company. HTC told the Taipai Times that it did not expect the row to have “much impact” on the sales of its handsets because users could download free-trial versions of some apps, before finally making a purchase decision.

More here.

 

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+3 #1 Bl0bb3r 2011-06-29 11:47
The average usage-life of an app is 5 days, after that it just stays there installed, likely never to be used again, or gets uninstalled. Returning the app after those 5 days would severely impact the future development of those apps, and so the whole mess would have arrived at the same point Google brought it now, to a stand still.

One way or the other, the Taiwanese would have lost anyway.
 
 
0 #2 Alterecho 2011-06-29 12:07
Quote:
SpokesGoogle


If thats not a mistake then lol..
 
 
+3 #3 Exodite 2011-06-29 12:29
Android Market used to have a 24 hour return policy. This was changed to 15 minutes at the behest of developers as a lot of applications were getting returned, with loss of revenue as a result.

Google probably can't renege on this return policy without going through a lot of misery with the developer community that pushed for the change in the first place, which is likely why they are hoping to come up with a deal with the Taiwanese government first.

In other news access to paid apps isn't worldwide yet, here in Sweden it's actually something of a latecomer.

Navigation is still missing, at that.
 
 
+7 #4 robert3892 2011-06-29 13:33
It's simple, Google needs to obey the law. Apple can do it so why can't they?
 
 
+8 #5 a1927 2011-06-29 14:12
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
The average usage-life of an app is 5 days

.
Are such applications worth to be written - and paid for - then?
I don't see a problem if developers creating such junk will go bankrupt.
 
 
0 #6 Bl0bb3r 2011-06-29 19:11
Quoting a1927:
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
The average usage-life of an app is 5 days

.
Are such applications worth to be written - and paid for - then?
I don't see a problem if developers creating such junk will go bankrupt.



But you got it upside-down... it's not the apps that are junk, it's the users.
 
 
+1 #7 bardenck 2011-06-29 20:01
you should be held accountable under the user agreement of google's contract. you knowingly are using a service that has a certain return policy. if you dont like that, then dont use the android market, go get an apple phone and see a whole new world of restrictions much worse than a freakin return policy. most every single app on the android market has a trial version anyway....
 
 
-8 #8 youserzero 2011-06-29 22:49
Taiwanese bastards! Don't they know corporate rights outway individual rights?

in $$$ we trust
 
 
+3 #9 tp9311a 2011-06-30 02:56
I like how in situations like these the mainlanders who just LOVE to claim Taiwan is part of China simply shuts the h*ll up and forgets what they preach. While in pretty much any other situation, they wouldn't wait a second telling how stupid someone is for thinking Taiwan is not part of China.

I wonder how many thumbs down I would get; I guess it depends on how many of the gay mainlanders are on fudz
 
 
+1 #10 Fierce Guppy 2011-06-30 11:53
Quoting youserzero:
Taiwanese bastards! Don't they know corporate rights outway individual rights?

in $$$ we trust




Go blow your Che doll! The Taiwan of today with its small businesses to its corporates is the outgrowth of people left free by government to seek $$$ so quit trying to peddle a conflict where there is none.
 

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